Matthew Scipione, Author of FM 12.3 (2021) Article “Transnational Filmmaking: The Intersubjective Gaze in Desierto”

Screenshot of Gael García Bernal in Desierto
Moises in Desierto (Esperanto Kino, 2015).

Film Matters: Please tell us about your article that is being published in Film Matters.

Matthew Scipione: “Transnational Filmmaking: The Intersubjective Gaze in Desierto is an analysis of Jonás Cuarón’s Desierto (2015). Set against the backdrop of a vast desert, the film is a suspense story about a group of Latinx migrants who are hunted by a white American gunman as they attempt to enter the United States. In my article, I examine how Cuarón’s transnational filmmaking presents the theme of national displacement by staging intersubjective camera/editing techniques that report xenophobic violence at the border. What is fascinating about the film is that it vacillates across different viewpoints that have been both physically and figuratively pushed to the margins of society. Similar to the migrants, the working-class citizen feels marginalized, alienated, and displaced. Everyone in the film belongs neither here nor there. Both the migrants and the citizen lack a sense of belonging. Through the film’s fluid audience identification, Cuarón crafts an ever-changing orientation that defies xenophobia by treating all of its subjects as equals. Desierto displays how citizen and migrant distinctions are now breaking down in the global era. As a filmmaker, Cuarón artistically uses transnational dislocation, intersubjective perception, and empathic representations to foster an all-inclusive collective consciousness.

Continue reading
Posted in Interviews | Comments Off on Matthew Scipione, Author of FM 12.3 (2021) Article “Transnational Filmmaking: The Intersubjective Gaze in Desierto”

Mason Leaver, Author of FM 12.3 (2021) Featurette “Authority Figures in Post-Revolutionary Society: Examining Romanian Attitudes Toward the Police in Pororoca and Police, Adjective

A screenshot from Pororoca of the back of a man sitting on a ledge, overlooking  an industrial landscape
A representation of the cynical attitude of Pororoca (Irreverance Films/Bad Unicorn, 2017).

Film Matters: Please tell us about your article that is being published in Film Matters.

Mason Leaver: My article analyzes the Romanian New Wave, and Romanian attitudes toward the police by examining two films: Police, Adjective, and Pororoca. Specifically, it takes a look at how Romanian directors see their present authority structures as being a remnant of the communist structures that were “destroyed” after the Romanian revolution. I also briefly compare the outlook of Romanian cinema with the outlook of Prisoners, an American film, to show the stark contrast in our nations’ cinemas.

Continue reading
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Mason Leaver, Author of FM 12.3 (2021) Featurette “Authority Figures in Post-Revolutionary Society: Examining Romanian Attitudes Toward the Police in Pororoca and Police, Adjective

FM 12.3 (2021) Officially Out!

Cover image for FM 12.3

Film Matters is pleased to announce officially the release of the final 2021 issue, FM 12.3, edited by the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) and featuring a dossier guest edited by Fabrizio Cilento (Messiah University), Otilia Baraboi (University of Washington, Seattle), and Ileana Marin (University of Washington, Seattle).

FM 12.3 includes the following peer-reviewed feature articles:

These “Romanian New Wave at 20” dossier featurettes:

These book reviews:

These film reviews:

And these DVD/Blu-ray reviews:

For more information about this issue, please visit: 

https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/fm/2021/00000012/00000003

Are you an undergraduate author who wants to be published in Film Matters? Then we want to work with you! Please check out all the different ways you can publish with us.

Happy November!

Posted in News | Comments Off on FM 12.3 (2021) Officially Out!

Ghosts of Past/Graves of Future. By Ben Dowd

This video essay explores Tarkovsky’s 1979 sci-fi classic, Stalker, through the lens of the philosophical concept of hauntology. Hauntology refers to the potential for dead or dying ideals to return and haunt the cultural ethos of subsequent generations. This essay intersperses scenes from the film with Soviet-era propaganda footage to highlight the visual discord between Stalker’s post-apocalyptic, alternate reality, and the illusory, utopian future the USSR failed to manifest. By melding the two forms of media together, the essay draws a causal line from past to future, and from aspiration to intergenerational trauma.

Author Biography

Ben Dowd is a recent graduate of East Tennessee State University with a B.S. in Media and Communications. He enjoys writing music, editing video and forgoing use of the Oxford comma. He aspires to be a trophy husband/lottery winner, but will settle for a fulfilling career creating things.

Posted in Videographic | Comments Off on Ghosts of Past/Graves of Future. By Ben Dowd

Samantha Van Zandt, Author of FM 12.2 (2021) Article “The Triumph of Trauma: Tarantino Style”

Screenshot from Kill Bill Volume 1 (Miramax, 2003)
Kill Bill Volume 1 (Miramax, 2003).

Film Matters: Please tell us about your article that is being published in Film Matters.

Samantha Van Zandt: “The Triumph of Trauma: Tarantino Style” illuminates Tarantino’s genius and artistic ability to demonstrate the journey of overcoming debilitating trauma. He provides us with that thirst for vengeance that we have all, at some point, experienced: satisfying a deep desire to avenge our former selves. Through thematical symbolism, Tarantino explains the evolution of one’s identity as they loudly test themselves on the battlefield of overwhelming trauma. In my article on the Kill Bill series, I pick apart the identity of each character by their code name, their behavior, and their connection with deep trauma.

Continue reading
Posted in Interviews | Comments Off on Samantha Van Zandt, Author of FM 12.2 (2021) Article “The Triumph of Trauma: Tarantino Style”

CFP 14.2: “Retrospective 1974: Fifty Years Later”

Film Matters is pleased to announce Chapman University’s CFP 14.2 for their third special issue, “Retrospective 1974: Fifty Years Later.” This themed call is inviting submissions from undergraduates and recent graduates for consideration in issue 14.2 (2023).

The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2023.

Film Matters has officially adopted MLA 9th edition style — so please prepare your submissions accordingly.  Purdue OWL’s MLA Formatting and Style Guide is an excellent resource to consult, in this regard.

For more information about this call for papers, please download the official document (PDF):

Submissions should include a cover sheet, which includes the author’s name, title of essay, institutional affiliation, and contact information; all other identifying information should be removed from the body of the text, in order to aid the blind peer review process.

And submissions and questions should be directed to:

  • specialtopicsfilmmatters AT gmail.com (please put “Issue 14.2” in the subject line) 

Please note that Film Matters does not accept submissions that are currently under review by other journals or magazines.

Undergraduates and recent graduates, please submit your film-related research papers today!  Chapman University looks forward to receiving your papers!

Posted in Calls, Chapman | Comments Off on CFP 14.2: “Retrospective 1974: Fifty Years Later”

Jonathan Monovich, Author of FM 12.2 (2021) Article “The ‘Eagle Scout Film’: David Lynch as Auteur and Genre Filmmaker”

Screen capture from the film David Lynch: The Art Life
David Lynch as a child in his Boy Scout uniform. David Lynch: The Art Life (Nguyen et al., 2016).

Film Matters: Please tell us about your article that is being published in Film Matters.

Jonathan Monovich: Knowing David Lynch’s background as an Eagle Scout, my article, “The ‘Eagle Scout Film’: David Lynch as Auteur and Genre Filmmaker” explores how many of Lynch’s films and their protagonists, particularly Jeffrey Beaumont (Kyle MacLachlan) in Blue Velvet (1986), embody Eagle Scout-like heroes and serve as genre-like “Eagle Scout films.” After conducting the necessary research, I recognized that Lynch’s films and their protagonists have many similarities with the film noir and western genres and their detective/cowboy heroes through their dealings with ethics, morality, and justice in sadistic worlds. Ultimately, in Lynch’s genre-hybrid films, he acts as an auteur by using recurring thematic preoccupations/stylistic tendencies, while exemplifying hostile environments offset by a central protagonist with an Eagle Scout-like set of morals (i.e., trustworthiness, kindness, bravery). Throughout my essay, I investigate David Lynch’s background as an Eagle Scout, how his experience as an Eagle Scout likely influences his films, and how his films have Eagle Scout-like protagonists that offset the cruel worlds they live in, helping classify a genre for his films that I define as the “Eagle Scout film.” Being a cinephile with an immense appreciation and admiration for French cinema and some of the most accomplished pioneers of film theory including André Bazin and Francois Truffaut, I strove to write my essay in a similar fashion to some of my idols.

Continue reading
Posted in Interviews | Comments Off on Jonathan Monovich, Author of FM 12.2 (2021) Article “The ‘Eagle Scout Film’: David Lynch as Auteur and Genre Filmmaker”

Clare Matthews, Author of FM 12.2 (2021) Article “Seeing Triple: Identification and Gamic Vision in Film and FPS Games”

Still from Peeping Tom (1960)
Viv performing for the diegetic camera, Mark and the viewer in Peeping Tom (Anglo Amalgamated Film Distributors Ltd., 1960).

Film Matters: Please tell us about your article that is being published in Film Matters.

Clare Matthews: My article “Seeing Triple: Identification and Gamic Vision in Film and FPS Games” investigates the subjective shot as used in film and first-person shooter (FPS) video games. It addresses questions of identification, and looks at the theoretical basis for the generally problematic nature of the subjective shot in film and also its successful use in FPS games. It includes in-depth analysis of Being John Malkovich and Peeping Tom, and identifies a novel class of subjective shot as used in these films, involving the merging of three looks, that is non-problematic.

Continue reading
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Clare Matthews, Author of FM 12.2 (2021) Article “Seeing Triple: Identification and Gamic Vision in Film and FPS Games”

Michael Stringer, Author of FM 12.2 (2021) Article “Over and Over, and Over Again: Tension, Repetition, and Catharsis in the Films of Wes Anderson”

Still from The Grand Budapest Hotel
M. Gustave and hotel staff, see The Grand Budapest Hotel (Fox Searchlight Pictures, 2014, 01:30:55).

Film Matters: Please tell us about your article that is being published in Film Matters.

Michael Stringer: My article looks at the films of Wes Anderson, and it tries to use parts of his very recognizable style to problematize elements of auteurism. Wes Anderson is often seen through the lens of auteurism, but I think there’re parts of his work that challenge this approach. So, I found his films to be an interesting opportunity to trouble auteurism from the inside, so to speak. I look at how Anderson repeats a lot of techniques, and I try to say that this repetition accomplishes more than we usually attribute to acts of repetition.

Continue reading
Posted in Interviews | Comments Off on Michael Stringer, Author of FM 12.2 (2021) Article “Over and Over, and Over Again: Tension, Repetition, and Catharsis in the Films of Wes Anderson”

Open Call for Statements of Interest for an Undergraduate-Authored Open Access Textbook

Film Matters, published by Intellect, is seeking statements of interest from undergraduate authors who are interested in writing a chapter for a forthcoming open access textbook that centers on producing the undergraduate film magazine. Individual chapter topics will fall within the broader subjects of (1) building strong writing practices and habits, (2) formal and stylistic considerations, (3) crafting an argument, (4) specific types of academic writing within the film studies discipline, from aesthetic analysis to film reviews, (5) the writing process, and (6) the publication process. Upon completion, the textbook will be used as the sole course material for FST 363: Producing the Undergraduate Film Magazine at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. As an open access resource, the completed textbook will also be free and available to other institutions that seek to integrate the material into any course(s).

This call for textbook chapters is open to any undergraduate student currently enrolled at any institution of higher learning worldwide, as well as any recent graduate (graduation date within the last twelve months) who is not currently enrolled in a graduate program. Interested parties should submit a statement of interest via email that includes their name, affiliated institution of higher learning, degree program, and year of study (first-year, sophomore, junior, senior, or recent graduate), and three general areas of interest selected from the six broad categories listed in the previous paragraph. Selected authors will be contacted with specific assignments and detailed instructions for the first draft of their chapter. Selected authors will work closely with the textbook’s editor to edit and refine their chapter ahead of the resource’s expected 2023 publication. All statements of interest from current undergraduate students or recent graduates will be considered.

Priority will be given to statements of interest submitted to FilmMattersOER@gmail.com by July 7, 2022.

All questions should be addressed to OER Editor Rachel C. Pittman (FilmMattersOER@gmail.com).

For more information about Film Matters, please visit: www.intellectbooks.com/film-matters or https://www.filmmattersmagazine.com/. For more information about open access publishing, please visit: https://library.uncw.edu/guides/open_educational_resources.

Posted in Calls | Comments Off on Open Call for Statements of Interest for an Undergraduate-Authored Open Access Textbook