Reminder: Open Call 9.1 Papers Due on February 1

Undergraduates, we’re seeking your film-related research papers for open call 9.1 today — the deadline is near! For more details about eligibility and the review process, please see the original announcement:

Email Liza Palmer (futurefilmscholars AT gmail.com) today, with questions or submissions — thanks!

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FM 7.2 (2016) Is Out!

Issue 7.2 of Film Matters is officially out.  It’s a 2016 issue — on the theme of filmic adaptation — guest edited by Greg Chan and his undergraduate students from Kwantlen Polytechnic University.

In this issue, you’ll find the following peer-reviewed feature articles:

  • A Sartrean Reading of Nicolas Winding Refn’s Driver by Vi Vo 
  • Adapting the Idiolect: Marion Cotillard’s Admirable Incarnation of Edith Piaf in Olivier Dahan’s La Vie en rose by Myrto Nika
  • The Wasteful Semblances of David Cronenberg’s Cosmopolis by John Garland Winn
  • Cobblestones and Doppelgängers: How Gothic Literature Contributed to the Dawn of Film Noir by Brandon Latham
  • Frank-N-Furter or the Modern Gothic: Adapted Subversion in The Rocky Horror Picture Show by Shaun Soman

The following featurettes:

  • The Mother, the Son, and the Psycho: Exploring Family Dynamics in Bates Motel by Melissa Houghton
  • Alfred Hitchcock: The Adaptor by Neil Bassan
  • Cinderella (2015) by Irene Halliday
  • The Theory of Everything (2014) by Fraser Readman
  • Guy Maddin’s My Winnipeg: The Criterion Collection Blu-ray Edition by Mathew Fabick 
  • Unveiling the Truth at the KDocs Film Festival by Ann Soo-Yeon Kim and Rachael Ransom

As well as book and film/DVD/Blu-ray reviews by:  Abigail Anundson, Paige Blankenship, Jackson R. Gentry, Travis Richard Merchant, Tanner Methven, Karsu Nalbantoglu, Brianna Okamoto, Lydia Plantamura, Cristina Ruiz-Poveda, Chance Saller, Rachel Wassil, and Austin Wellens.

For more information about issue 7.2, please visit Intellect’s website: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=3186/

Film Matters is always looking for new authors and guest editors.  Please get in touch with us today!

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Captain Fantastic (2016). Reviewed by Frederik Hartmann

Captain Fantastic (Bleecker Street Media, 2016)

Captain Fantastic (Ross, 2016) imagines an intellectual experiment in child-rearing. In it, Ben Cash (Viggo Mortensen) and his wife, Leslie (Trin Miller), have decided to raise their spawn in a remote area of the Pacific Northwest. We enter the story after she, the victim of episodes of paranoid schizophrenia, kills herself in a Texas hospital, leaving Ben to care for their six children on his own. Leslie’s treatment has been paid for by her wealthy parents, who had considered Ben to blame for Leslie’s condition and who had demanded that he stay away from their daughter. When word reaches Ben that Leslie’s parents plan on ignoring Leslie’s Buddhist wishes by giving her a Christian funeral, he bolts into action and decides that he and the kids will attend. After a short discussion, Ben and the kids jump on their bus “Steve” and begin the journey south. The majority of the film concerns the culture clash between the sheltered, yet highly educated and cultured kids, and contemporary society. Continue reading

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2016 Telluride Horror Show: Introduction

Tucked into the gorgeous mountain village of Telluride, Colorado, the Telluride Horror Show (telluridehorrorshow.com) captures an intimately local, if eerily secluded feeling. I had to fly to Denver, make a connecting flight to tiny Montrose Regional Airport, and then take an hour-and-a-half shuttle to finally reach the destination. The three-day event, this year’s seventh edition running from October 14-16, is held during the resort town’s tourist off-season. As a younger, smaller film fest, it has not yet receiving the deserved publicity that will inevitably and imminently turn it into another overwhelmingly crowded affair of the festival scene. Being able to actually talk with programmers and special guests (I actually rode the shuttle into Telluride with a guest speaker) is not something that can be said for, say, Sundance. Of course, watching something you realize you adore, before any studio has even picked it up for distribution, something that would not otherwise be consumed in its proper theatrical form, is always a pure and joyous feeling in itself.      Continue reading

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Raw (Grave, 2016). Reviewed by Zach Villemez

Raw (Focus World, 2016)

The Body Horror Hype Machine Raw Is Surprisingly Delightful

Raw was one of the secret screenings at Telluride Horror Show. No one going into the theater knew what they were about to see. One of the festival programmers stood at the front to introduce the film without naming it—quite impressive showmanship. He talked about it winning the FIPRESCI Prize at Cannes and how some viewers had apparently fainted at the Toronto International Film Festival, unable to stomach the body horror elements. At this proclamation two uneasy audience members near the front, unwilling to risk fainting themselves, promptly exited to a humorous uproar from the rest of the crowd. Yes, this film has a reputation.
Continue reading

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The Eyes of My Mother (2016). Reviewed by Zach Villemez

The Eyes of My Mother (Borderline Films, 2016)

The Eyes of My Mother Will Make You Feel for the Killer

The Eyes of My Mother (2016) is writer/director Nicolas Pesce’s debut film, feature or otherwise, but something this affecting and beautiful has no business as a first effort. (Literally the only other credit listed on Pesce’s IMDB page is “miscellaneous crew” for the remake of the Mel Brooks classic The Producers (1967), starring Matthew Broderick instead of Gene Wilder.) Young horror filmmakers tend to either go for something brutally self-aware—dumb fun—or, in a genre overflowing with homage, wear their influences on their sleeves. But Pesce has created something truly singular that can still make you squirm. Continue reading

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We Are the Flesh (Tenemos la carne, 2016). Reviewed by Zach Villemez

We Are the Flesh (Arrow Films, 2016)

We Are the Flesh Doesn’t Quite Win My Filthy Heart

This is definitely a weird one. We Are the Flesh (2016) is feverish, often abstract, artsy, and almost plotless, but its most glaring trait, what everyone will be talking about, is its transgressiveness, primarily through very, very explicit, and often distressing, sexuality. It can be a difficult watch, and I find these sort of “dare” movies fascinating. (“You gotta watch this movie. She makes him eat her menstrual blood!”) And it is perversely fascinating in the moment. However, I found myself unable to connect on any deeply meaningful level; I always felt one final step removed from euphorically dirtying myself along with it. Continue reading

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Documenting History: From Iran: A Separation. Reviewed by Mina Radovic

From Iran: A Separation (Noori Pictures, 2013)

From Iran: A Separation (Noori Pictures, 2013)

Cinema Guild’s latest release of the documentary From Iran: A Separation (2013) explores the intimate significance of Asghar Farhadi’s Oscar-winning A Separation (2011) for the people of Iran: its reception, how its accolades confirmed Iran’s presence in contemporary world cinema, and perhaps most significantly what the Oscar win meant, in a time when there existed the threat of nuclear war between Iran and the United States. By mixing lively talking heads, archival footage, innovative animation techniques, and personal firsthand interviews with local audiences, directors Kourosh Ataee and Azadeh Moussavi explore the importance of A Separation for Iranian people and how its international reception determined representations of a whole nation on the global level.
Continue reading

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Reminder: Deadline for Contemporary Science Fiction Cinema CFP Is December 1

Undergraduate authors, Fabrizio Cilento and students at Messiah College are seeking your scholarly work on contemporary science fiction cinema.  Please see the original announcement for more details:

The deadline for submissions is: December 1, 2016.

And questions and submissions should be directed to Fabrizio Cilento (fcilento AT messiah.edu).

Please consider submitting today!

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FM 7.1 (2016) Is Out!

Film Matters is pleased to officially announce the release of issue 7.1, our first issue for 2016!

In this issue, you’ll find the following peer-reviewed feature articles:

    • The Act of Piracy: Accessing The Act of Killing in Indonesia by Kristi Kouchakji
    • Liberated Sexualities?: The Conflation of Power and Sexuality in the Postfeminist Discourse by Emma Mary Blauciak
    • Draw It Out First: Early Animation as an Influence of Avant-Garde Cinema and Experimental Film by Madeleine M. Rodriguez
    • Alterity, Mise-en-Scène, and Episodic Narrative in the Crime Serials of Louis Feuillade by Archie Wolfman
    • Derogatory Disguise: A Matter of Identity in the Cinematic Era of Minstrel Shows by Austin Hunt
    • Francisco Franco and the Nuevo Cine Espagnol: The Boundaries of Censorship in 1960s Spanish Cinema by Basil Swartzfager
    • All Ate Up With Maggots: Transcendent Decay in Korine’s Gummo by Jack Forey
    • The Masala Complex: Rape-Revenge Cinema, Grassroots Feminism, and the Conflicting Gaze in Mardaani by Mekiya Walters

This “Mapping Contemporary Cinema” article:

  • A Female Homme-Com?: Genre, Gender, and Sex in Bridesmaids (2011) by Emily Eyre

This featurette:

  • Q & A with Gaming in Color Director Philip Jones by Kailyn N. Warpole

As well as book and film/DVD/Blu-ray reviews by:  Abigail Anundson, Sam Archer, John Bennett, Paige Blankenship, Reed Brewer, Thomas Brint, Joseph Bye, Leila Estes, Jackson R. Gentry, Adam Getz, Ty Johnson, Travis Richard Merchant, Karsu Nalbantoglu, Brianna Okamoto, Taylor K. O’Steen, Lydia Plantamura, Chance Saller, Chic Scaparo, Rachel Wassil, and John Garland Winn.

For more information about issue 7.1, please visit Intellect’s website: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=3185/

Film Matters is always looking for new authors and guest editors.  Please get in touch with us today!

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