Reminder: Open Call 8.3 Papers Due on September 1

Undergraduates, think about submitting those film-related research papers to open call 8.3 today — the deadline is upon us!  For more information, please see the original announcement:

Email Liza Palmer (futurefilmscholars AT gmail.com) today, with questions or submissions — thanks!

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Announcing a New Film Matters Venture: Open Call for Undergraduate Videographic Film Scholarship

Inspired by the groundbreaking work of Jason Mittell and Christian Keathley, among others, of inTransition (http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/intransition/), Film Matters is excited to announce our first call for videographic film scholarship by undergraduate students — an initiative managed by Allison De Fren and Adam Hart.

For more information about this opportunity, including specific instructions for formatting submissions, please download the official document:

The deadline is October 1, 2016.

Questions and submissions should be directed to Allison De Fren and Adam Hart at: VideographicFM AT gmail.com

And for a recent example of videographic criticism, published by Film Matters, please consult the following from Jennifer Fleeger and Jordan Scharaga:

Scoring Night and the City. By Jennifer Fleeger and Jordan Scharaga

We look forward to receiving your video submissions!

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The Pursuit of Happyness (2006). Reviewed by Harsh Mahaseth

The Pursuit of Happyness (Sony Pictures, 2006)

The Pursuit of Happyness (Sony Pictures, 2006)

Can a man face a plethora of hardships both personally and professionally to pursue a bit of happiness, especially when the only happiness he knows of is the word “happyness” written on a wall? The answer would be this movie, which is based on a true story written by Steven Conrad and is directed by Gabriele Muccino. This movie was an immediate success with audiences and has been critically acclaimed as “an inspirational and often emotionally wrenching story.”[1]
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Announcing Call for Papers on Contemporary Science Fiction Cinema

Film Matters is pleased to announce a CFP for a dossier on Contemporary Science Fiction Cinema — guest edited by Fabrizio Cilento, Messiah College — slated for FM 8.3 (2017).

A range of formats is welcome — reviews of recent science fiction films, reviews of recent scholarly books on the science fiction genre, or interviews with relevant scholars in the field — in addition to essays.

For more information, please download the official document (in Word):

The deadline for submissions is: December 1, 2016.

And questions and submissions should be directed to Fabrizio Cilento (fcilento AT messiah.edu).

Please consider submitting today!

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Judging for the 2016 Masoud Yazdani Award Is Underway

Film Matters is pleased to announce that the judging for the 2016 Masoud Yazdani Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Film Scholarship has begun.

Nineteen candidates – feature article authors from volume 6 issues – are automatically being considered for the annual book prize, given in honor of Masoud Yazdani, late chairman (and all-around visionary) of Intellect. Our award candidates represent the following academic institutions:

  • Carleton College
  • Edge Hill University
  • Harvard College
  • Institute of Art Design and Technology
  • King’s College London
  • Queen Mary, University of London
  • University of Bristol
  • University of Calgary
  • University of California, Los Angeles
  • University of California, Santa Barbara (x3)
  • University of Exeter
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • University of Rochester
  • University of South Florida
  • University of Southern California
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Yale University

We are fortunate to be working with the following judges and thank them for their service to Film Matters, as well as the discipline of film and media studies:

Frederic Leveziel is a French native with a PhD in Spanish living in Tampa, Florida. He teaches French and Spanish film, language, and culture. Leveziel is currently writing a book chapter on the Spanish and Portuguese diasporas in France, and is also working on an article on The River by Jean Renoir. He will be doing research on Renoir at the University of California, Los Angeles in August in preparation for his manuscript.

Tom Ue is the Frederick Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the English Department at the University of Toronto and an Honorary Research Associate at University College London. He has published on Canadian cinema, Studio Ghibli, and representations of Toronto. Ue is currently at work on a book chapter about Quentin Tarantino and the western, and his long-term project is a monograph about the White Messiah. He teaches courses in film and literature at the University of Toronto.

Johnny Walker is Lecturer in Media at Northumbria University in the UK, author of Contemporary British Horror Cinema: Industry, Genre and Society (Edinburgh UP, 2015) and the co-editor of the following: Snuff: Real Death and Screen Media (2016) and Grindhouse: Cultural Exchange on 42nd Street, and Beyond (2016). He is the founding editor of the Global Exploitation Cinemas book series published by Bloomsbury, and is currently writing a book on the infancy of video rental culture in Britain for the University of Exeter Press.

Film Matters looks forward to announcing the 2016 winner later in the year. Please watch this space for updates.

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2015 New York Film Festival: Introduction

L-R: Christian Leus, Dominique Silverman, Adam Reece, Connor Newton

L-R: Christian Leus, Dominique Silverman, Adam Reece, Connor Newton

It rained nonstop during our October trip to the 2015 New York Film Festival. Rather than seeming dreary, the weather heightened the coziness of Film Society of Lincoln Center’s series of theaters that hosted the festival. We hurried along the wet roads, splashed through puddles, and huddled together under umbrellas as we made our way down the busy city streets. The theaters provided welcome shelter from the pouring rain and blustering wind; we left one world and, for a spell, entered others. For five days we enjoyed the opportunity to view curated films and discuss them over delicious food in this new environment where anything seemed possible.
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Arabian Nights: Volume 3, The Enchanted One (2015). Reviewed by Adam Reece

Arabian Nights: Volume 3, The Enchanted One (Miguel Gomes, 2015)

Arabian Nights: Volume 3, The Enchanted One (Miguel Gomes, 2015)

Miguel Gomes’s The Arabian Nights: Volume 3, The Enchanted One (Gomes 2015), like the collection it takes its name from, tells a shimmering frame tale of loosely interwoven stories. The heroine, Xerazade (Crista Alfaiate), who has been telling the King stories in order to indefinitely forestall his bloodthirsty nature, leaves the palace that she has stayed in most of her life. Outside, she meets bandits, a spirit of the wind, and Paddleman (Carloto Cotta), father of many children, who is beautiful but dumb. She sings “Perfidia” on a rock overlooking the sea. She meets her father (Américo Silva), the vizier, on a Ferris wheel, and he tells her to go back to the palace, reassuring her of her ability. Gomes, in the outer narrative, seems to be channeling a distinctly Portuguese yet quirkily Wes Anderson style. Not having seen the first two films, I found Xerazade’s scenes fun yet seemingly light on substance.
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Cemetery of Splendour (2015). Reviewed by Christian Leus

Cemetery of Splendor (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2015)

Cemetery of Splendor (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2015)

On a rainy night in October, in the small Francesca Beale Theatre at Lincoln Center, Cemetery of Splendour, the latest film from Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul, guided its audience through an oneiric meditation on time, compassion, and nationalism. Set and shot in the small Thai village where Apichatpong grew up, the film centers around a community struggling with a mysterious sleeping sickness that affects only its soldiers. Housed in a school-turned-hospital and hooked up to machines that radiate soft, colored light, the soldiers become the link between the waking townspeople and the invisible dream world of the past that surrounds them. As protagonist Jen (Jenjira Pongpas Widner) begins caring for solitary soldier Itt (Banlop Lomnoi), she remarks that she is sleeping less, as if the comatose man were resting for her. Simultaneously, her waking life grows stranger: goddesses join her at a picnic table, and young psychic medium Keng (Jarinpattra Rueangram) tells her that the comatose soldiers are fighting an ancient war in their sleep. Apichatpong’s camera treats all of these events matter-of-factly, his wide-angle long taking in cool sunlight and synthesizing the mystical and quotidian with the same unquestioning logic that structures our best dreams.
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Les Cowboys (2015). Reviewed by Connor Newton

Les Cowboys (Thomas Bidegain, 2015)

Les Cowboys (Thomas Bidegain, 2015)

Thomas Bidegain’s 2015 film Les Cowboys acts as a modern interpretation of John Ford’s The Searchers (1956), using an immigrant-populated and culturally shifting France as a backdrop, as opposed to the American West. At the center of Les Cowboys is an investigation of terrorism: Bidegain uses Islam as the “culprit,” whereas Ford used Native American culture. The film’s narrative revolves around the disappearance of a young girl who has supposedly run off with a radical Islamic sect, and the chase that ensues by her father and younger brother. Les Cowboys, in its pursuit of finding the missing girl, works as an interrogation of various cultures and how the decisions we make help to define us. The search is for an older culture; the search is for something human, the daughter/sister, but her disappearance functions as a microcosm for the volatility of culture as a whole.
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Don’t Blink: Robert Frank (2015). Reviewed by Christian Leus

Don’t Blink: Robert Frank (Laura Israel, 2015)

Don’t Blink: Robert Frank (Laura Israel, 2015)

In Alice Tully Hall, I got my first introduction to Robert Frank – photographer and documentarian, most noted for 1958’s The Americans, a photo book documenting subjects all over the US. Utterly unfamiliar with Frank’s work, I came into Laura Israel’s documentary Don’t Blink: Robert Frank not knowing what I would find.
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