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The Dreamers (2003). Reviewed by Jake Dyson

One of the most undervalued films of the last twenty years is Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers (2003), a masterfully wrought picture that serves, in equal parts, as a panegyric on the power of cinema and a warning to those who … Continue reading

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Calling All Instructors: Judges Needed

Film Matters is searching for three judges to determine the winner of the 2018 Masoud Yazdani Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Film Scholarship. For more information about this award, please see the initial announcement (http://www.filmmattersmagazine.com/2014/09/02/announcing-the-masoud-yazdani-award-for-excellence-in-undergraduate-film-scholarship/). If you are a current instructor … Continue reading

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FM 8.3 (2017) Is Out!

Film Matters is pleased to announce that its last issue of the 2017 volume year is now out.  In this issue, you will find the following peer-reviewed feature articles: A Forced Silence: The Hidden Homonormativity Surrounding Carol by Isabella Luizzi The Revival of … Continue reading

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Announcing Themed CFP 10.2

Film Matters is pleased to announce a new themed call for papers — on documentary — for consideration in issue 10.2 (2019), guest edited by Margaret C. Flinn and students at The Ohio State University. Undergraduates and recent graduates, please submit your theme-related research … Continue reading

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The Wicker Man and the Dangers of Zealotry. Reviewed by Nick Bugeja

Many accomplished horror films utilize restricted locales to evoke suspicion, anxiety, and dread. The claustrophobic space of the starship Nostromo appreciably contributed to the petrifying mood in Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979). In Rosemary’s Baby (1968), Roman Polanski centered the filmic … Continue reading

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FM 8.2 (2017) Now Out!

Film Matters is pleased to announce the release of FM 8.2 (2017) — guest edited by Matthew Sorrento and undergraduate students from Rutgers University-Camden. In this issue, you’ll find the following features/featurettes: Beyond Morricone: The Other Italian Film Composers by George Kristian Kubrick Becoming: An Interview … Continue reading

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Neely Gonidosky’s Behind the Bars, an Animated Short Film, Set for Release Monday, December 11, 2017

Behind the Bars is an animated short film by award-winning animator Neely Goniodsky, exploring the themes of racial oppression, prejudice, and the power of art to overcome and communicate one’s struggles to the world. Based on a poem by Edward Smyth Jones. … Continue reading

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L’avventura (1960). Reviewed by Film Matters Fall 2017 Editorial Board

L’avventura Criterion Blu-ray Review from Liza Palmer Contributors: Catherine Colson, Jamie Foley, JT Fritsch, Sean Gallagher, Danet Grabbe, Breanna Grim, Matthew Johnson, Garrett Neal, Cheyenne Puga, Austin Grey, Ethan Schneier, Anthony Wilson, and K. M. Wise.

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Groundhog Day: The Day Before Tomorrow. Reviewed by Luke Batten

“If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.” –Steve Jobs Phil Connors (Bill Murray) brings a whole new meaning to this carpe diem sentiment in Groundhog Day (1993). Self-centred TV weatherman … Continue reading

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Pluralism as Penance: Pablo Larraín’s The Club. Reviewed by Stephen Borunda

Pablo Larraín’s unorthodox drama The Club (2015) centers on a company of dishonored parochial members that live just outside a small beach community named La Boca (The Mouth) in central Chile. While the setting of the film may be unfamiliar … Continue reading

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