Category Archives: Reviews

To Choose in La La Land. Reviewed by Elham Shabani

How many times have we had to decide between two seemingly equal opportunities? Probably a great many! Such is the case with the life of the two main characters in the Oscar-winning musical La La Land. The movie was released … Continue reading

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The Dissolution of Naivety is the Dissolution of Transformation: Andrés Wood’s Machuca (2004). Reviewed by Stephen Borunda

“My poor, un-white thing! Weep not nor rage. I know, too well, that the curse of God lies heavy on you. Why? That is not for me to say, but be brave! Do your work in your lowly sphere, praying … Continue reading

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I Am Jane Doe (2017). Reviewed by Ariana Aboulafia

Every once in a while, a film – in this case,  a documentary – comes along on a particular topic that is so eye-opening that it makes you stop and ask yourself how in the hell you didn’t know about … Continue reading

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Lost in Translation (2003). Reviewed by Niko Pajkovic

“I just don’t know what I am supposed to be,” explains Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson) to the washed-up movie star Bob Harris (Bill Murray) as both characters quietly contemplate their lives. It is a question steeped in naïve uncertainty and existential … Continue reading

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Filmatique. Reviewed by Emmett Williams

Filmatique (http://www.filmatique.com/) is a website that caters mainly to people who have grown tired of Netflix’s inconsistent quality and poor user interface. It offers fresh, new, and mostly foreign, films, from unknown directors and exotic locales. The site organizes these … Continue reading

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Neruda (2016). Reviewed by Stephen Borunda

“If God is in my verse” …if God is in my verse, I am God If God is in your distressed eyes, you are God… (Neruda, Poetry of Neruda 6) [Please be aware that the following film review contains spoilers.] … Continue reading

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Socialism on Film (SOF). Reviewed by Emmett Williams

Socialism on Film (SOF) is a remarkable project, detailing the history of the most important political, philosophical, and economic movement of the last one hundred and fifty years, and its reflection on the cinema. An undertaking quite clearly years in … Continue reading

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A Dog’s Purpose (2017). Reviewed by Ariana Aboulafia

Making A Dog’s Purpose into a movie probably sounded like a really good idea on paper. After all, the novel (originally written by W. Bruce Cameron in 2010) was a #1 New York Times bestseller, selling over 2.5 million copies … Continue reading

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As Good as You (2015). Reviewed by Kim Carr

In Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare writes: “Everyone can master a grief but he who has it.”  This summarizes the plot of Heather de Michelle’s film As Good as You (2015).  The audience watches the protagonist Jo (Laura Heisler) attempt … Continue reading

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The Boss Baby: A Surrealist Tour de Force That Reconciles Capitalism and Love. Reviewed by Daniel Spielberger

In a recent Fresh Air interview with Alec Baldwin, Terry Gross welcomed the fifty-nine-year-old star, “First things first, congrats on The Boss Baby.” I couldn’t help but laugh at this opening — a title like The Boss Baby (2017) solicits … Continue reading

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